biggertigers:

ofplanet-earth:

-teesa-:

9.4.14

Michael Che speaks to Jim Gilchrist, president of the Minuteman Project, about the “invasion” of immigrant children.

I wish I could have seen that dude’s face though, because yes, the americans—the supposed inventors and protectors of freedom—are the nazis in this metaphor. 

I don’t think that was an accident, a quick Google search of Jim Gilchrist shows he is a white supremacist. Gross.

14,888 notes

thisisfusion:

The fifth edition of urban art festival Santurce es Ley wrapped up last week in Puerto Rico, bringing street artists from all over the world to a San Juan neighborhood that is going through a cultural renaissance after decades of neglect.

The festival also showcased homegrown talent such as Colectivo Moriviví, formed by seven girls who recently graduated from art high school.

Written by Nuria Net, photos courtesy of JUSTKIDS. 

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One of the oldest refugee camps in Africa is remarkable not just for its stone houses instead of plastic tarps. The camp is also full of markets and traders, selling everything from imported fabric to smartphones.

Mohammed Osman Ali, a Somali refugee, runs an arcade at the camp. He rents out time on a PlayStation to other refugees from Eritrea, Ethiopia, or fellow Somalis.

Ali has faced problems running his arcade. For instance, his game controllers break as quickly as he can buy them. Ali figured out the problem. Refugees like him had witnessed war and seen family members killed. And they were unloading their stress — smashing their thumbs into the buttons of the controllers.

Ali learned to repair old controllers from the wreckage of older, junk ones.

This is a classic, up by the bootstraps, immigrant story. But Ali is not an immigrant. He’s a refugee. And outside of Uganda, in most other parts of the world, he wouldn’t be able to start this business. It would be illegal for him to have any job.

But Uganda has had a right-to-work policy for the last 15 years. And it’s allowed refugees to earn money and support themselves instead of being a burden on international aid.

A professor at Oxford, Alex Betts, and a team of researchers studied the impact of the policy. They surveyed 1600 Ugandan refugees and found refugee businesses (like Ali’s arcade) play a role in Uganda’s economy. When Ali buys a new controller or diesel to run the generator that powers his arcade, he buys from Ugandan businesses.

And Betts found that when refugee businesses hire other people, nearly half of those employees are Ugandan nationals. So refugees in Uganda may take jobs, but they also make new ones.

Unfortunately, that economic contribution — may not seem so vibrant to ordinary Ugandans.

Osman Faiz, another refugee at the camp, says he gets regularly harassed and overcharged in Ugandan shops.

Faiz’s wife, Sada, says she’d prefer being called ‘migrant’ instead of refugee. She says, “A migrant, at least, that would sound something good…. [When] you are just a refugee, you are just nothing.”

Despite being able to work in Uganda, all the people I met at the camp have put in their applications with refugee organizations to leave. They’re trying to get permanent asylum in a country even more welcoming to refugees (i.e., the U.S.). But the process is uncertain and can take decades.

As I’m leaving the arcade, Ali runs after me. He asks me to share a message. Make use of us, he says. While we’re strong and healthy and can contribute something to the US economy. Ali says, Don’t wait to take us until we’re old and we’re tired.

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thinksquad:

The first wave of National Guard troops has taken up observation posts along the Texas-Mexico border.

Several dozen soldiers deployed in the Rio Grande Valley are part of the up to 1,000 troops called up by Gov. Rick Perry last month, Texas National Guard Master Sgt. Ken Walker of the Joint Counterdrug Task Force said Thursday.

Several guardsmen were seen Thursday afternoon manning an observation tower along the busy road leading to the Hidalgo International Bridge.

This first batch of soldiers was specifically trained to man such observation towers in the area belonging to local law enforcement agencies and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Walker said. They will serve as extra eyes on the border and report suspicious activity to authorities.

State officials have estimated the deployment, which they’ve called a “deter and refer” mission will cost $12 million per month.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/first-national-guard-troops-texas-mexico-border

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salviprince:

Not surprised about the Furgeson-Gaza connexion. The LAPD goes to Israel, goes to the Salvadoran government to exchange tactics in repression. El Salvador’s civil war,  informed Iraq. Most heads of repressive governments are trained on American School of the Americas. There’s a million of these connexions. World wide repression is an interconnected fuckfest really, with it’s heart in America. The repression in Ferguson isn’t an anomaly it’s this country’s tradition.

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humansofnewyork:

"The refugees have been given very limited resources, but they’ve found ways to maximize the usefulness of these resources. We established a lighting system to provide security. Before long, we noticed that shopkeepers had been tapping into our electrical lines, and using the electricity to light their shops. We tried to prevent this, because our electricity is limited, but more and more people figured out the trick. More and more wires began appearing. Eventually we succumbed to the inevitable. We found the first group of shopkeepers who had siphoned the electricity. We told them: ‘OK, we’re going to allow this. But you’re in charge of regulating it.’" -Gavin White, External Relations Officer of UNHCR 

(Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)

humansofnewyork:

"The refugees have been given very limited resources, but they’ve found ways to maximize the usefulness of these resources. We established a lighting system to provide security. Before long, we noticed that shopkeepers had been tapping into our electrical lines, and using the electricity to light their shops. We tried to prevent this, because our electricity is limited, but more and more people figured out the trick. More and more wires began appearing. Eventually we succumbed to the inevitable. We found the first group of shopkeepers who had siphoned the electricity. We told them: ‘OK, we’re going to allow this. But you’re in charge of regulating it.’" 
-Gavin White, External Relations Officer of UNHCR 

(Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)

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pokerwithplato:

unrepentantauthor:

masterofbirds:

did-you-kno:

Hawaii was first called the Sandwich Islands.
Source

Pretty sure it was first called  Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu,Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui and Hawaiʻi.
The earliest habitation supported by archaeological evidence dates to as early as 300 CE, whereas the 1778 arrival of British explorer James Cook was Hawaiʻi’s first documented contact with European explorers. Cook named the islands the “Sandwich Islands” in honor of his sponsor John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.
Because things only exist when Europeans discover them smh

This. ffs

Bloop

pokerwithplato:

unrepentantauthor:

masterofbirds:

did-you-kno:

Hawaii was first called the Sandwich Islands.

Source

Pretty sure it was first called  NiʻihauKauaʻiOʻahu,MolokaʻiLānaʻiKahoʻolaweMaui and Hawaiʻi.

The earliest habitation supported by archaeological evidence dates to as early as 300 CE, whereas the 1778 arrival of British explorer James Cook was Hawaiʻi’s first documented contact with European explorers. Cook named the islands the “Sandwich Islands” in honor of his sponsor John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.

Because things only exist when Europeans discover them smh

This. ffs

Bloop

12,507 notes

fuckyeahmexico:

Marcha zapatista por la paz, San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas (2011)
baldhorianas submitted

fuckyeahmexico:

Marcha zapatista por la paz, San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas (2011)

submitted

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humansofnewyork:

"The fighting got very bad. When I left Syria to come here, I only had $50. I was almost out of money when I got here. I met a man on the street, who took me home, and gave me food and a place to stay. But I felt so ashamed to be in his home, that I spent 11 hours a day looking for jobs, and only came back to sleep. I finally found a job at a hotel. They worked me 12 hours a day, for 7 days a week. They gave me $400 a month. Now I found a new hotel now that is much better. I work 12 hours per day for $600 a month, and I get one day off. In all my free hours, I work at a school as an English teacher. I work 18 hours per day, every day. And I have not spent any of it. I have not bought even a single T-shirt. I’ve saved 13,000 Euro, which is how much I need to buy fake papers. There is a man I know who can get me to Europe for 13,000. I’m leaving next week. I’m going once more to Syria to say goodbye to my family, then I’m going to leave all this behind. I’m going to try to forget it all. And I’m going to finish my education." (Erbil, Iraq)

humansofnewyork:

"The fighting got very bad. When I left Syria to come here, I only had $50. I was almost out of money when I got here. I met a man on the street, who took me home, and gave me food and a place to stay. But I felt so ashamed to be in his home, that I spent 11 hours a day looking for jobs, and only came back to sleep. I finally found a job at a hotel. They worked me 12 hours a day, for 7 days a week. They gave me $400 a month. Now I found a new hotel now that is much better. I work 12 hours per day for $600 a month, and I get one day off. In all my free hours, I work at a school as an English teacher. I work 18 hours per day, every day. And I have not spent any of it. I have not bought even a single T-shirt. I’ve saved 13,000 Euro, which is how much I need to buy fake papers. There is a man I know who can get me to Europe for 13,000. I’m leaving next week. I’m going once more to Syria to say goodbye to my family, then I’m going to leave all this behind. I’m going to try to forget it all. And I’m going to finish my education." (Erbil, Iraq)

6,610 notes

oupacademic:

Bridging Refugee Youth and Children’s Services (BRYCS) has thousands of resources on refugee and immigrant children and youth in a searchable online clearinghouse. Two particularly valuable resources include:

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