ernestoyerena:

PEACE MIGRATES. 2012. 

ernestoyerena:

PEACE MIGRATES. 2012. 

87 notes

theswansays:

Cynthia Robin, a professor of anthropology at Northwestern University, called Patel’s research a “very significant finding” and stressed the importance of looking at history to inform the present.

“One of the things we know about Maya society is before the Spanish conquest there was no glass ceiling for women as there appears to be in our own society,” she said.

Robin said that in Maya culture, women were heads of state as well as war lords.

“One of the great things about archaeological research is that it can show us how different life was in the past and how it is in the future,” she said. “So if we assume that gender relations were always the same then we’re just kind of justifying the inequalities that exist today.”

47 notes

Norma never expected to walk into a police station and come out an informant. The decision was supposed to be her saving grace, instead it bound her to a criminal life.

Producer: Nancy Lopez

1 note

4 notes

califasqueen:

lil-reina:

ruggednraw:

Ensenada Mexico.

:)

mi Ensenada adorada, cómo no te voy a querer?

3,913 notes

guatepolitics:

guatepolitics:

Above: The check given to communities says “Ayuda humanitaria por inocentes del 4 de octubre de 2012 en la Cumbre de Alaska,” or “Humanitarian Aid for the Innocents of October 4, 2012 in the Alaska.”

On that day, approximately 3,000 peaceful protestors — mostly K’iche’ Maya from the Totonicapan — gathered to protest rising electricity prices. The army shot and killed 6 unarmed protestors and wounded others. At first, OPM’s representative claimed that the army didn’t even have guns, only admitting the truth after cellphone pictures proved the lie (2nd photo from top). Since then, President Pérez Molina once said that he might be willing to apologize for the massacre, but he chose not to.

The President [of Guatemala] did not apologize, or give explanations, and also said that offering an explanation was unlikely. Otto Perez Molina, at a ceremony Thursday at the National Palace of Culture, also neglected to use the word “victims” to describe the [non-violent] protestors who were wounded and lying on the ground in the wake of military action against the 48 cantones of Totonicapán on October 4, 2012, at km 169 of the Pan-American Highway. Instead, the president offered aid: Q6,550,000 as compensation.

The compensation, which is equivalent to a little less than $85,000 (US), will be split between 6 widows and the 35 survivors who were wounded that day. If none of the money were shared with the 35 survivors, the widows would receive at most $14,100 each as ‘compensation’ for the loss of their husbands, and no recognition — much less an apology — of the fact that the Guatemalan army shot and killed these peaceful protestors in broad daylight.

If you read Spanish, full article by Oswaldo J. Hernández | photos by Sandra Sebastián are at Plaza Pública.

tzoc-che: ooh, yah, using compensation to massacre survivors as a photo-op with *giant check* (again, without recognition or apology), definitely not classy

56 notes

bearpope:

Alejandro Cartagena captured Mexican workers on their way to job sites in Car Poolers. This is such an amazing and simple photo series. 

(Source: ufunk.net)

45,950 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Rest in power Dedé Mirabal (3/1/1925 - 2/1/2014)
Dedé was the last living member of the MIrabal sisters. Four sisters, Patria, Minerva, Maria Teresa and Dede Mirabal had the courage to stand up to Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, who ruled the country from 1930 to 1938 and from 1942 to 1952. They distributed pamphlets about Trujillo’s numerous victims and engaged in other activities against the oppressive regime.
The sisters were arrested and imprisoned frequently, but they refused to back down. Finally on Nov. 25, 1960, Patria, 36, Minerva, 34, and Maria Teresa, 25, along with their driver, were clubbed to death by Trujillo’s men. Trujillo himself was assassinated just six months later.
The Mirabal sisters became international heroines for their work for democracy. That’s why so many locals were saddened Saturday when they learned the last surviving Mirabal sister, Dede — Bélgica Adela Mirabal-Reyes — died just a month short of her 89th birthday.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Rest in power Dedé Mirabal (3/1/1925 - 2/1/2014)

Dedé was the last living member of the MIrabal sisters. Four sisters, Patria, Minerva, Maria Teresa and Dede Mirabal had the courage to stand up to Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, who ruled the country from 1930 to 1938 and from 1942 to 1952. They distributed pamphlets about Trujillo’s numerous victims and engaged in other activities against the oppressive regime.

The sisters were arrested and imprisoned frequently, but they refused to back down. Finally on Nov. 25, 1960, Patria, 36, Minerva, 34, and Maria Teresa, 25, along with their driver, were clubbed to death by Trujillo’s men. Trujillo himself was assassinated just six months later.

The Mirabal sisters became international heroines for their work for democracy. That’s why so many locals were saddened Saturday when they learned the last surviving Mirabal sister, Dede — Bélgica Adela Mirabal-Reyes — died just a month short of her 89th birthday.

Source

1,158 notes

thinkmexican:

La Cultura Cura

Xochi Peña is an Aztec dancer from San Francisco, California. She comes from a long line of danzantes. Her great-grandfather on her mother’s side was also an Aztec dancer in her family’s native Toluca, Mexico State.

This image should remind us all of the beautiful culture our ancestors gave us, and how practicing this culture helps heal the wounds of colonization. Culture cures. 

Read more about Xochi here: http://thinkmexican.tumblr.com/post/16338255100/11-year-old-family-aztec-dance-tradition 

#laculturacura #decolonize #danzaazteca #aztecdancers #indigenous #mexican #nahuatl #mextagram #sfmission #thinkmexican

thinkmexican:

La Cultura Cura

Xochi Peña is an Aztec dancer from San Francisco, California. She comes from a long line of danzantes. Her great-grandfather on her mother’s side was also an Aztec dancer in her family’s native Toluca, Mexico State.

This image should remind us all of the beautiful culture our ancestors gave us, and how practicing this culture helps heal the wounds of colonization. Culture cures.

Read more about Xochi here: http://thinkmexican.tumblr.com/post/16338255100/11-year-old-family-aztec-dance-tradition

#laculturacura #decolonize #danzaazteca #aztecdancers #indigenous #mexican #nahuatl #mextagram #sfmission #thinkmexican

283 notes

yahoonewsphotos:

Mexican vigilantes struggle against drug cartels

Vigilantes seized a drug cartel’s bastion in western Mexico on Sunday, sparking a shootout as the civilian militia gained new ground in their struggle against the gang in a violence-plagued region.

Hundreds of armed civilians riding in more than 100 pickup trucks rolled into the Michoacan state town of Nueva Italia and were met by gunfire from presumed Knights Templar cartel members when they reached the municipal office. (AFP)

See more photos of Mexican vigilantes as they struggle against drug cartels and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!

710 notes

belarabi:

Allow me to speak my Arab tongue
Before they occupy my language as well.
Allow me to speak my mother tongue
Before they colonize her memory as well.
I am an Arab woman of color,
And we come in all shades of anger.

-Rafeef Ziadah

belarabi:

Allow me to speak my Arab tongue

Before they occupy my language as well.

Allow me to speak my mother tongue

Before they colonize her memory as well.

I am an Arab woman of color,

And we come in all shades of anger.

-Rafeef Ziadah

254 notes